Triceratops in the forest

10 Best Dinosaur with horns

Dinosaurs

10 Best Dinosaur with horns

Although the most famous, Triceratops was far from the only dinosaur (horned and congested dinosaur) in the Mesozoic period. In fact, more serotypes have been discovered in North America in the past twenty years than any other type of dinosaur. Below you will find 10 Best Dinosaur with horns that were the same in all matters with triceratops, whether in size, decoration or as research topics by paleontologists.

Zuniceratops

Zuniceratops

Zuniceratops makes the list for being the earliest occurrence of a horned ceratopsian in North America. This has raised fresh questions over whether horned ceratopsians evolved in North America or Asia first, though while we might have an idea, in all likelihood the early horned ceratopsians probably radiated out across both continents and back again several times. Zuniceratops was named in honour of the Zuni tribe.

Styracosaurus

Styracosaurus

Styracosaurus is closely related to Centrosaurus, and was one of the most recognizable heads in any Seratopsian, at least until the recent discovery of exotic North American breeds such as Kosmoceratops and Mojoceratops. As with all serapathobes, Straxosaurus’ horns and ropes are more likely to have evolved as sexually selected features – males with larger, more detailed and pronounced hats had a better chance of intimidating their competitors in the herd and attracting females available during the mating season.

Triceratops

Triceratops

Triceratops would have lived alongside other types of ceratopsian dinosaurs, though not the previously mentioned Styracosaurus as it is often depicted since this genus lived much earlier in Campanian stage of the Cretaceous, whereas Triceratops is late Maastrichtian. Either Triceratops and Torosaurus are indeed separate, or Triceratops would be the first known ceratopsian where frill holes suddenly appear upon adulthood.

Pachyrhinosaurus

You might recognize Pachyrhinosaurus (the “thick-nosed lizard”) as the star of the late, unlamented Walking with Dinosaurs: The 3D Movie. Pachyrhinosaurus was one of the few late Cretaceous ceratopsians to lack a horn on its snout; all it had were two small, ornamental horns on either side of its enormous frill.

Protoceratops

Protoceratops
Restoration of P. andrewsi

The protoceratops were that rare, middle-aged monster, medium-sized seratopsi, not as small as its predecessors (like the five-pound aquilops), or four or five tons like its North American successors, but a 400, 500-pound or pound pig of weight. As such, this made Protoceratops in Central Asia an ideal prey for the contemporary Velociraptor. In fact, paleontologists have identified famous Velociraptor fossils that fight in a Protoceratops battle, before burying the two dinosaurs due to a sudden sandstorm.

Pentaceratops

Pentaceratops

This “two-horned face” was only three centuries old, and the third century (at the end of his plan) didn’t have much to write about at home. Pentaceratops’ true claim to fame is that it possesses one of the largest heads in the entire Mesozoic era: 10 feet long, from the tallest decoration to the tip of the nose. This makes the head of the Pentaceratops longer than the closely attached head of the Triceratops and is presumed deadly when used in combat.

Pachyrhinosaurus

Pachyrhinosaurus

You may recognize Pachyrhinosaurus (“Thick-nosed Lizard”) as the star of late non-dinosaur walks – a 3D movie. Pachyrhinosaurus was one of the few Cretaceous outings that lacked a century in its plan. They all had two small antlers on the sides of the huge ruffles.

Centrosaurus

centrosaurus-apertus-by-cheungchungtat
At the Coast of Inland Sea — Centrosaurus apertus by cheungchungtat

Centrosaurus is the classic example of what paleontologists refer to as “centrosaurine” ceratopsians, that is, plant-eating dinosaurs possessing large nasal horns and relatively short frills. This 20-foot-long, three-ton herbivore lived a few million years before Triceratops, and it was closely related to three other ceratopsians, Styracosaurus, Coronosaurus, and Spinops. Centrosaurus is represented by literally thousands of fossils, unearthed from massive “bonebeds” in Canada’s Alberta province.

Einiosaurus

Einiosaurus

Einiosaurus has rapidly become one of the more popular ceratopsian dinosaurs thanks mostly to the unusual nasal horn that curves around like a can opener. How the horn grew though is also interesting. In hatch lings the horn would have been a small upwards facing point, and then as juveniles grew the horn would not only increase in length, but would also begin to curve forwards. In the most mature individuals, the horn would curl almost right round upon itself into the distinctive can opener shape.

Chasmosaurus

Chasmosaurus by Ricky Beckett
Chasmosaurus by Ricky Beckett

The main group of ceratopsian dinosaurs that are separate from the centrosaurines are the chasmosaurines, of which Chasmosaurus is the type genus. Chasmosaurus and relative genera are noted for having less elaborate horn displays than centrosaurines, but at the same time they had far larger and more elaborate neck frills. Modern interpretations of the horns and neck frills are that they were for display, and since chasmosaurines became more common during the Late Campanian and proceeding Maastrichtian, it seems that ceratopsians began to favour larger crests over horns.

Source: NatGeo.comWikipedia.org & thoughtco.com

Also read: Top 10 Ceratopsians

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